Women in Defence UK Awards 2020: Category Criteria

Table of Contents

Please press ‘Left Click’ (the left-click on your mouse or keyboard) on the category you would like to see the criteria for. This will take you to the relevant page without the need to scroll.

 

Inspirational Award

Oustanding Contribution Award

Most Collaborative Award

Special Award

Equality of Opportunity Award

Emerging Talent Award

Unsung Heroines Award

Innovation Award

STEM in Defence Award

Inclusive Teamwork Award

 

Inspirational Award

 

This award is to recognise where an individual has demonstrated having inspired or positively influenced the choices of other colleagues.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where an individual has had an unusually positive influence or impact on other individuals – this could be over a long period of time or a specific element of support. The impact of that influence could take many forms; for example, a change in behaviour; increased ambition or motivation; achievement of potential; the courage to call out wrongdoing. The key line is in the title - ‘Inspirational’, for it is far more challenging to inspire others than to be inspired, which is what this award aims to recognise. The judges will expect to see evidence of how the nominee has acted as a role model.

See also

The Inspirational Award shares similarities with the Outstanding Contribution Award as both categories relate to individuals who have exceeded all expectations. The key element of the Inspirational Award is the role model aspect – inspiring others; the key element of the Outstanding Contribution Award is an exceptional contribution to the output or mission of their organisation. For early career professionals, also consider the Emerging Talent category which is for women who consistently demonstrate exceptionally high performance in their role.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Finalists from earlier years

Last year’s finalists were from BAE Systems and MI5, with the winner recognised for a novel project to improve maternity support in the Royal Navy. The other finalists were nominated for making their workplace better for both LGBT+ and non-LGBT+ staff. Previous winners and finalists have also featured individuals who have overcome life threatening injuries, an aspiring astronaut, and those who have inspired at regimental level.

 

Who can be entered?

This category is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form)

  • Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

Outstanding Contribution Award

 

This award is to recognise an outstanding contribution to their organisation where the nominee has exceeded expectations.

 

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for nominees who have gone over and above the expectations of their role to deliver an exceptional contribution to the output or mission of an organisation. This might be the nominee’s employer or a client they have worked for, but the organisation should be working in defence of the nation. They may have demonstrated more than one example of going above and beyond at different times during their career – the nomination can relate to a single or multiple contributions at any stage of the individual’s career. There is no minimum experience needed for this award.

See also

The Outstanding Contribution Award shares similarities with the Inspirational Award as both categories relate to individuals who have exceeded all expectations. The key element of the Outstanding Contribution Award is an exceptional contribution to the output or mission of their organisation. The key element of the Inspirational Award is the role model aspect – inspiring others;

For early career professionals, also consider the Emerging Talent category which is for women who consistently demonstrate exceptionally high performance in their role.

The Outstanding Contribution Award shares similarities with the Unsung Heroines category. The key difference is that the Unsung Heroine award improves the ‘lot’ of people working in defence of the nation, whereas the effect of the work under the Outstanding Contribution category is to improve the output of organisations, as they work to meet their vision or mission in support of the defence of the nation.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

 

Finalists from earlier years

Last years’ finalists were from the Defence, Science and Technology Laboratory (dstl) and the Ministry of Defence and saw nominations for in-service support to UK submarines, including the Vanguard Class nuclear submarines, support to the investigations into chemical weapon use in Salisbury, UK, and Syria, and applying mathematical and statistical thinking in all aspects of work. Other nominations have ranged from leading the Invictus Games Choir, to re-establishing UK under-ice submarine capability, hurricane relief in response to Irma and Maria in 2017, and to making a significant contribution to changes to the Royal Military Police, the Army Servicewomen’s Network and the Army.

 

Who can be entered?

This category is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form)

  • Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

Hints and tips

 

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

 

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

Most Collaborative Award

 

This award is to recognise where an individual has demonstrated that creating a collaborative working arrangement within their organisation or with another organisation has created a positive impact.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where the collaborative approach adopted by an individual has made a real impact to an initiative or business output. This could be collaborating with others within teams, in charitable, cultural or business initiatives, or more widely across the defence enterprise. The benefits realised could include shared knowledge and information, efficiency savings through shared costs or an improved service.

See also

There are similarities between the Most Collaborative Award and the Inclusive Teamwork Award. The key difference is that the Most Collaborative Award is for individuals and focuses on the benefits realised through collaborative working, whilst the Inclusive Teamwork Award is for teams and focuses on the creation of an inclusive teamwork approach where everyone’s opinion is valued.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Finalists from earlier years

Last years’ finalists were from the QinetiQ, the Royal Navy, and the Royal Air Force. The winner was rewarded for her work leading the programme management office of the £20 billion UK Lightning programme.

Previous nominations have covered an exceptionally wide range of work, featuring the challenge of delivering a multimillion contract to construct new accommodation in remote locations, developing cutting edge forensic techniques and building relationships between Iraqi forces and politicians and a US-led Coalition.

Take a look at a video produced by the 2016 winner of the Most Collaborative Award, to inspire you to nominate someone that may have had a similar journey. https://youtu.be/D8jlkx8VGHA

Who can be entered?

This category is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form)

  • Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

 

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

Special Award

 

This award is to recognise achievements that do not fit directly under one of the other categories and includes a key element of overcoming adversity.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where an individual has achieved something that doesn’t directly relate to the headline descriptions for any of the other award categories. The Special Award should include an element of overcoming real adversity, either personal or business/environmental/cultural.

Finalists from earlier years

Last year’s finalists were from the Army and Royal Air Force, with the winner being recognised for her contribution to her organisation as an exceptionally skilled explosive ordinance engineer and ammunition technician.

Previous finalists have been nominated for their work helping others suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and other mental health issues, whilst others were recognised for their determination in the sport of Boxing, their involvement in the Sea Cadets, the retail sector and establishing the highly successful Recruit for Spouses initiative. 

Who can be entered?

This category is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form)

  • Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

 

Hints and tips

 

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

 

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

 

 

Equality of Opportunity Award

 

This award is to recognise where an individual, team or organisation has worked to create an environment where there is equality of opportunity for any gender. Examples are; implementing policy change to enable shared parenting, leading a cultural shift so that people feel able to be authentically themselves, or role modelling flexible working. 

A re-framing of the Promotion of Gender Balance Category

The Equality of Opportunity Category shares many of the activities or examples of the original Promotion of Gender Balance category but changes emphasis from the aim of gender balance, to actions that change the culture or environment of an organisation or team, so that all genders have equality of opportunity.  

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where an individual, team or organisation have helped to create the conditions where equality of opportunity can thrive.  Whilst not an exhaustive list, this could be by; changing paternity leave and pay policy so that fathers can take an equal share in caring responsibilities; taking positive action in recruiting or promotion to reduce possible effects of unconscious bias; senior leaders working flexibly thus giving ‘permission’ for everyone to do the same; female leaders role modelling being authentically themselves rather than reflecting the leadership style of the majority.

See also

 

Inclusive teamwork category.  The Inclusive Teamwork category has a particular focus on teamworking in an inclusive way, where all team members have had a voice and been able to contribute, leading to a successful outcome with a tangible positive impact for the organisation.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

 

Who can be entered?

This category is open to all individuals, teams and organisations.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the individual, team or organisation you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have their agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think they deserve to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form)

  • Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this individual, team or organisation (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how they have demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results they have achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

 

Hints and tips

 

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

 

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation will be shortened before being sent for judging if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

Emerging Talent Award

 

This award is to recognise early career professionals (including apprentices and graduates) demonstrating high performance, who are within their first five years of work following the end of formal training or schemes.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where professionals at an early stage in their career are consistently demonstrating high performance within their role. Examples of high performance could be related to leadership, technical ability, creativity, persistence in a complex role, etc. The judges aren’t necessarily looking for a ground-breaking piece of work, more so the commitment to fulfilling their role to have the greatest impact.

 

See also

The Emerging Talent award shares similarities with many of our other awards, in particular the Outstanding Contribution Award and the Inspirational Award. All three awards relate to individuals who have exceeded all expectations. The key difference is that the Emerging Talent Award relates to where this has occurred at an early stage in an individual’s career.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

 

Finalists from earlier years

Last years’ finalists were from Rolls Royce, BAE Systems and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (dstl). The winner of this category was nominated for her significant contribution to the design and build of the Challenger 2 tank, ‘Black Night’, upgrade vehicle.

Previous nominees have been recognised for work on the future weapon systems for the new F-35 aircraft, the management of battlefield lower limb trauma, delivering Defensive Cyber Operations for the RAF, and for pioneering work to research infectious diseases in the context of the Armed Forces.

Who can be entered?

This category is open to individual women only. Individuals must be within five years of the end of a degree, or graduate or apprentice scheme, or within five years of starting work without any formal training.

 

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form)

  • Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

 

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

 

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

Unsung Heroines Award

 

This award is to celebrate those women who, on an enduring basis, have improved the ‘lot' of people in defence, essential to an organisation's output but never seeking recognition for what they do.

What will the judges be looking for?

 

The judges will be looking for examples of women who work tirelessly and loyally, perhaps over many years; often the mainstay of a business unit, team or group; encouraging others with a kind or good word; or being the cheerful backbone of an organisation; essential to its output and always willing to go the extra mile to support others; never seeking recognition for themselves for what they contribute.

 

See also

The Unsung Heroines category shares similarities with the Outstanding Contribution award. The key difference is that the Unsung Heroines award improves the lot of people working in defence of the nation, whereas the effect of the work under the Outstanding Contribution category is to improve the output of organisations, as they work to meet their vision or mission in support of the defence of the nation.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

 

Finalists from earlier years

This is the third year this category has been available. Last year’s finalists were from Royal Navy and Defence Equipment and Support, with the winner recognised for her outstanding contribution in her day job as a PUMA engineer and the extensive pastoral support she provides to her local RAF community. The other finalists were nominated for the career-long commitment to the equality of opportunity and to supporting mental health first aid.

Who can be entered?

This category is open to individual women only.

 

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form)

  • Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

 

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

Innovation Award

 

This award is to celebrate those women who have achieved excellence in innovation that has multiplied the effect of the UK defence mission.

 

What will the judges be looking for?

 

The innovation achieved could be in many different spheres, examples are science and technology, ways of working, funding, smarter government. The nominee could be the originator and developer of the idea, the leader who recognised its value and enabled it to happen or any other individual worthy of recognition. The judges will be looking for evidence of the effect of the innovation – quicker, more efficient, less costly or other improvements.

Finalists from earlier years

This is the third year this category has been available. The finalists from the 2019 Awards were from Rolls Royce, BAE Systems, and Joint Forces Command. The winner was nominated for her innovative approach to reactor physics at Rolls Royce and her strong leadership in improving the company’s engineering capability.

Previous finalists have been from the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (dstl), the Royal Navy and MI5. Nominations have included work in the field of synthetic biology, developing new innovation teams and developing new methods to share intelligence information.

 

Who can be entered?

This category is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details

• Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form)

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words)

2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

Hints and tips

 

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

 

STEM in Defence Award

 

This award is to recognise an individual or team for promoting and supporting activities for young women studying science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where individuals or teams have supported STEM activities or set up new initiatives that have had a positive impact in getting more young women interested in these subjects.

Finalists from earlier years

Last year’s finalists were from BAE Systems, Defence, Science and Technology (dstl) and a joint team from the Royal Air Force, Rolls Royce and the Royal Air Forces Association charity; the winner was recognised for their creative, (using YouTube), and inclusive approach to inspiring the next generation of girls and boys to pursue a career in STEM.

Previous finalists have masterminded a STEM careers showcase for 900 secondary school aged girls, worked with Girl Guiding units to develop a badge focused around STEM learning, developed teams purely focused on improving STEM engagement with schools and aspiring engineers, whilst others set out to challenge individuals across both primary and secondary schools on their perception about STEM subjects and the career opportunities that these can result in.

 

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individuals of any gender and teams.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the woman, man or team you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have their agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think they deserve to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination

  • form)

• Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman, man or team (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how they have demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results they have achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Inclusive Teamwork Award

 

This award is to recognise where a team has demonstrated inclusive working, and where all team members have had a voice and been able to contribute, leading to a successful outcome with a tangible positive impact for the organisation.

What will the judges be looking for?

Margaret Heffernan, author of Wilful Blindness says: “An inclusive culture in one in which difference such as background, education, thinking styles and cultural orientation are seen as an asset not a problem.” This is precisely what our judges will be looking for; teams where individuals feel that their voice is heard without them having to shout. Inclusive teams are where members don’t have to hide who they are or change to fit in with the norm.

The judges will not just be looking for diverse teams. Whilst diversity and inclusion often grouped together, they are not the same. You can have a diverse workforce without being inclusive. Diversity is about increasing the representation of minority groups in the workforce. Inclusion is about fostering an environment that values the individuals in a diverse workforce and brings them together.

See also

The key difference between this category and the Most Collaborative Award is the focus on an inclusive approach.

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one category by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, as long as the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Finalists from earlier years

Last year’s finalists were from the Ministry of Defence and Northrop Grumman; the winners being recognised for their collaborative, dedicated and passionate approach to preparing for EU Exit in the Ministry of Defence in a large team of over fifty members.

Previous finalists have been nominated for commitment to and implementation of diversity and inclusion, including the 17 Port and Maritime Regiment RLC who were the only regiment in the British Army with a woman at every rank from Private to Lieutenant Colonel, in the year leading to the 2017 awards. Other nominations ranged from creating an inclusive working environment for diverse teams whilst delivering world class advice to assess value for money on weapon system programmes to bringing together women and men across multiple Defence Intelligence sites to promote gender equality and diversity – and to bring about progressive change in the organisation.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to teams only. Teams can include any gender.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to www.womenindefenceuk.com/awards-2020 but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

  • Provide the contact details of the team you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have their agreement to share their details

  • Tell us briefly why you think they deserve to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination

  • form)

  • Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

  1. An overview of why you are nominating this team (maximum of 200 words)

  2. An explanation of how they have demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

  3. Examples of the results they have achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience as you so please explain the significance.

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.