Women in Defence UK Awards 2021: Category Criteria

Table of Contents

Please press ‘Left Click’ (the left-click on your mouse or keyboard) on the category you would like to see the criteria for. This will take you to the relevant page without the need to scroll.

 

Inspirational Award

Oustanding Contribution Award

Most Collaborative Award

Resolute Spirit Award

Equality of Opportunity Award

Emerging Talent Award

Unsung Heroines Award

Innovation and Creativity Award

STEM in Defence Award

Inclusive Teamwork Award

 

Inspirational Award

 

This award is to recognise where an individual has demonstrated having inspired or positively influenced the choices of other colleagues.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where an individual has had an unusually positive influence or impact on other individuals – this could be over a long period of time or a specific element of support. The impact of that influence could take many forms; for example, a change in behaviour; increased ambition or motivation; achievement of potential; or the courage to call out wrong-doing. The key line is in the title - ‘Inspirational’, for it is far more challenging to inspire others than to be inspired, which is what this award aims to recognise. The judges will expect to see evidence of how the nominee has acted as a role model.

See also

The Inspirational Award shares similarities with the Outstanding Contribution Award as both categories relate to individuals who have exceeded all expectations. The key element of the Inspirational Award is the role model aspect – inspiring others; the key element of the Outstanding Contribution Award is an exceptional contribution to the output or mission of their organisation. For early career professionals, also consider the Emerging Talent Award which is for women who consistently demonstrate exceptionally high performance in their role.

Finalists from earlier years

Last year’s finalists were from Babcock, the Army, and the Royal Navy. The winner was recognised for her inspirational and innovative efforts in driving transformative, positive change as People Director at Babcock DST, by improving the working culture, particularly for women and minority staff. The other finalists were nominated for their pioneering role in helping to break down barriers and stereotypes for women joining the Infantry, and for their inspirational command of the Coastal Forces Squadron, leaving a lasting and inspiring legacy and having an  impressive effect in forwarding the cause of Women in the Navy.  

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

 

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

 

Outstanding Contribution Award

 

This award is to recognise an outstanding contribution to their organisation where the nominee has exceeded expectations.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for nominees who have gone over and above the expectations of their role to deliver an exceptional contribution to the output or mission of an organisation. This might be the nominee’s employer or a client they have worked for, but the organisation should be working in defence of the nation. They may have demonstrated more than one example of going above and beyond at different times during their career – the nomination can relate to single or multiple contributions at any stage of the individual’s career. There is no minimum experience needed for this award.

See also

The Outstanding Contribution Award shares similarities with the Inspirational Award as both categories relate to individuals who have exceeded all expectations. The key element of the Outstanding Contribution Award is an exceptional contribution to the output or mission of their organisation. The key element of the Inspirational Award is the role model aspect – inspiring others. For early career professionals, also consider the Emerging Talent Award which is for women who consistently demonstrate exceptionally high performance in their role.

The Outstanding Contribution Award shares similarities with the Unsung Heroines Award. The key difference is that the Unsung Heroine award improves the ‘morale’ of people working in defence of the nation, whereas the effect of the work under the Outstanding Contribution Award is to improve the output of organisations, as they work to meet their vision or mission in support of the defence of the nation.

Finalists from earlier years

Last years’ finalists were from the Ministry of Defence, the Army and QinetiQ. The winner was nominated for leading and completely transforming the Cost Assurance and Analysis Service, driving a strong inclusion and diversity agenda. The finalists were nominated for delivering a generational change to materials testing in Defence, proving critical to operations, and for a lifetime of dedication and outstanding achievements in support of the RAF for over 60 years.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

 

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

Most Collaborative Award

 

This award is to recognise where an individual has demonstrated that creating a collaborative working arrangement within their organisation or with another organisation has created a positive impact.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where the collaborative approach adopted by an individual has made a real impact to an initiative or business output. This could be collaborating with others within teams, in charitable, cultural or business initiatives, or more widely across the defence enterprise. The benefits realised could include shared knowledge and information, efficiency savings through shared costs or an improved service.

See also

 

The Most Collaborative Award shares similarities with the Inclusive Teamwork Award. The key difference is that the Most Collaborative Award is for individuals and focuses on the benefits realised through collaborative working, whilst the Inclusive Teamwork Award is for teams and focuses on the creation of an inclusive teamwork approach where everyone’s opinion is valued.

Finalists from earlier years

Last years’ finalists were from MI5, the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory. The winner was nominated for her role in the delivery of the UK’s response to the poisoning in Salisbury in March 2018, where her drive towards collaborative joint working helped transform ‘Russia Mission’ collaboration across UKIC, HMG and Foreign Liaison Services. The other finalists were nominated for their consistent and vibrant research collaborations that helped to yield a significant body of research data in the area of nuclear weapon plasma physics, and for championing improved collaboration between the U.S. Government, eight Partner Nations, and worldwide industry.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individual women only.

 

 

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination

form).

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

 

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

Resolute Spirit Award

This award is to recognise individual women who have the steadfast spirit to persevere whilst overcoming real adversity.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where an individual has shown true determination to overcome real adversity. This could include continued difficulty related to business, environment or culture, or experienced in their personal life. This award has evolved from the Special award, which included a strong element of overcoming adversity.

Finalists from earlier years – please note these were finalists for the Special Award

Last year’s Special Award finalists were from the Army Cadet Force, the Royal Navy and BAE Systems. The winner was nominated for her exceptional charity and volunteering efforts, raising awareness, funds and support for Veteran mental health, whilst overcoming her own mental illness challenges. She ran 45 marathons, swam the English Channel, cycled the length of New Zealand, and is a 4 x Invictus Games medallist and 3 x Guinness World Record Holder. 

The finalists were nominated for their outstanding charity work and inspirational approach to life despite a diagnosis of bone cancer, and for pursuing their goals, both professionally and personally, whilst dealing with several traumatic life events which severely impacted their mental health.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

 

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

Equality of Opportunity Award

This award is to recognise where an individual, team or organisation has worked to create an environment where there is equality of opportunity for all genders. Examples are; implementing policy change to enable shared parenting, leading a cultural shift so that people feel able to be authentically themselves, or role modelling flexible working. 

A re-framing of the Promotion of Gender Balance Award

The Equality of Opportunity Award shares many of the activities or examples of the original Promotion of Gender Balance Award but changes emphasis from the aim of gender balance, to actions that change the culture or environment of an organisation or team, so that all genders have equality of opportunity. 

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where an individual, team or organisation have helped to create the conditions where equality of opportunity for all genders can thrive.  Whilst not an exhaustive list, this could be by; changing paternity leave and pay policy so that fathers can take an equal share in caring responsibilities; taking positive action in recruiting or promotion to reduce possible effects of unconscious bias; senior leaders working flexibly thus giving ‘permission’ for everyone to do the same; female leaders role modelling being authentically themselves rather than reflecting the leadership style of the majority.

Finalists from earlier years

Last years’ finalists were from Babcock and BMT. The winner of this Award was nominated for her work spearheading equality of opportunity within BMT’s design and engineering business by founding the Technical women’s Forum and Diversity and Inclusion Boards, and igniting change within the organisation, such as gender independent recruitment and specialised PPE for all genders. The other finalist was nominated for her work to raise the profile of women and boost their career opportunities, including implementing flexible working policies, in a site where females currently make up less than 15% of the ~6000 employees.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to all individuals, teams and organisations.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman, man, individual, team or organisation you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have their agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think they deserve to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this individual, team or organisation (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how they have demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results they have achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation will be shortened before being sent for judging if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

Emerging Talent Award

 

This award is to recognise early career professionals (including apprentices and graduates) demonstrating high performance, who are within their first five years of work following the end of formal training or schemes.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where professionals at an early stage in their career are consistently demonstrating high performance within their role. Examples of high performance could be related to leadership, technical ability, creativity, persistence in a complex role, etc. The judges aren’t necessarily looking for a ground-breaking piece of work, more so the commitment to fulfilling their role to have the greatest impact.

See also

The Emerging Talent award shares similarities with many of our other awards, in particular the Outstanding Contribution Award and the Inspirational Award. All three awards relate to individuals who have exceeded all expectations. The key difference is that the Emerging Talent Award relates to where this has occurred at an early stage in an individual’s career.

Finalists from earlier years

Last years’ finalists were from The Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Cavendish Nuclear, and the Royal Navy.  The winner of this award was nominated due to her ability to consistently produce quality work, champion diversity and inclusion, and be the youngest person to be appointed as a quality lead within the science function at AWE, leading a group of 90 people. The finalists were nominated for their innovative, critical support of the MSR1 Safety Case, and for their exemplary work commanding, setting up and building the Rapid Response Team throughout the military response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individual women only. Individuals must be within five years of the end of a degree, or graduate or apprentice scheme, or within five years of starting work without any formal training.

 

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

 

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

Unsung Heroines Award

 

This award is to celebrate those women who, on an enduring basis, have improved the ‘lot' or morale of people in defence which is essential to an organisation's output, but never seeking recognition for what they do.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of women who work tirelessly and loyally, perhaps over many years; often the mainstay of a business unit, team or group; encouraging others with a kind or good word; or being the cheerful backbone of an organisation; essential to its output and always willing to go the extra mile to support others; never seeking recognition for what they contribute.

See also

The Unsung Heroines Award shares similarities with the Outstanding Contribution award. The key difference is that the Unsung Heroines award improves the ‘lot’ or morale of people working in defence of the nation, whereas the effect of the work under the Outstanding Contribution Award is to improve the output of organisations, as they work to meet their vision or mission in support of the defence of the nation.

Finalists from earlier years

Last year’s finalists were from the Ministry of Defence, the Army and MBDA. The winner was nominated for the huge impact she has had working at the forefront of military detention for the last 12 years, whether mentoring military detainees at the Military Corrective Training Centre or running the Special Forces’ holding facility in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The other finalists were nominated for being the driving force behind the biggest advances in UK Armed Forces body armour in decades, working tirelessly to ensure that our servicemen and women are given the very best protection possible, and for their longstanding dedication to their team and role as Head of Weapon System Simulation and Experimentation at MBDA over the past twenty years, showing what can be achieved when communication and wellbeing are prioritised in an open, no-blame culture.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individual women only.

 

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words)

2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words)

3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words)

 

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

 

 

 

 

Innovation and Creativity Award

This award is to celebrate those women who have used imagination, creativity, inventiveness, or ingenuity in an innovative manner that has multiplied the effect of the UK defence mission.

What will the judges be looking for?

The effect on the mission could be in many different spheres, examples are ways of working, operations, funding, smarter government, science and technology. The nominee could be the originator and developer of the idea, the leader who recognised its value and enabled it to happen or any other individual worthy of recognition. The judges will be looking for evidence of the effect – improved morale or retention, quicker, more efficient, less costly or other improvements.

A re-framing of the Innovation Award

The addition of creativity to the previously named ‘Innovation Award’ broadens the award to emphasise that innovation occurs throughout all fields of work, not just in the scientific or engineering sectors.  

Finalists from earlier years (from the Innovation Award)

The finalists of last year’s Innovation Award were from the Army and RAF. The winner was nominated for her innovative efforts in developing a new fused intelligence product for 1 Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconaissance Wing in support of multiple UK and overseas operations. The other finalists were nominated for their work in advancing COVID healthcare at a national level, and for their exceptional contributions in advancing Defence Pathology. 

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individual women only.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have her agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think she deserves to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how she has demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results she has achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

STEM in Defence Award

 

This award is to recognise an individual or team for promoting and supporting activities for young women studying science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects.

What will the judges be looking for?

The judges will be looking for examples of where individuals or teams have supported STEM activities or set up new initiatives that have had a positive impact in getting more young women interested in these subjects.

Finalists from earlier years

Last year’s finalists were from BAE Systems, Optima Systems Consultancy and Babcock. The winner was recognised for their creative and inclusive approach to inspiring future generations, using YouTube to encourage the next generation of girls and boys to pursue a career in STEM.  Other finalists created a unique project to inspire and educate young girls about Engineering in a fun and engaging way, and created a STEM outreach programme, supporting 145 activities including workshops, career events and university visits leading to a significant increase in females expressing interest in engineering.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to individual women and men, as well as teams.

 

How do I nominate?

 

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the woman, man or team you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have their agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think they deserve to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this woman, man or team (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how they have demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results they have achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

 

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.

Inclusive Teamwork Award

 

This award is to recognise where a team has demonstrated inclusive working, and where all team members have had a voice and been able to contribute, leading to a successful outcome with a tangible positive impact for the organisation.

What will the judges be looking for?

Margaret Heffernan, author of Wilful Blindness says: “An inclusive culture in one in which difference such as background, education, thinking styles and cultural orientation are seen as an asset not a problem.” This is precisely what our judges will be looking for; teams where individuals feel that their voice is heard without them having to shout. Inclusive teams are where members don’t have to hide who they are or change to fit in with ‘the norm’.

The judges will not just be looking for diverse teams. Whilst diversity and inclusion are often grouped together, they are not the same. You can have a diverse workforce without being inclusive. Diversity is about increasing the representation of minority groups in the workforce. Inclusion is about fostering an environment that values the individuals in a diverse workforce and brings them together.

See also

The Inclusive Teamwork Award shares similarities with the Most Collaborative Award. The key difference between this award and the Most Collaborative Award is the focus on an inclusive approach, as oppose to the benefits realised through collaborative working.

Finalists from earlier years

Last year’s finalists were from the Ministry of Defence and The Royal Navy. The winners were nominated for how they worked together, as a team of volunteers led by a junior officer spanning a wide range of roles, experience, age, rank and gender, to improve gender diversity at the senior levels of the military. The two finalist teams were nominated for their successful efforts in building a truly positive, inclusive and supportive culture amongst all its staff, and for improving and standardising the support available to pregnant servicewomen, enabling them to access an optimal standard of fitness training, medical care and protection.

Who can be entered?

This award is open to teams only. Teams can include any gender.

How do I nominate?

Nominating someone is simple, just go to the Women in Defence UK 2021 Awards Nominations Proforma, but we advise that you read this first!

 

To nominate, follow these easy steps:

• Provide the contact details of the team you are nominating, please note the need to confirm that you have their agreement to share their details.

• Tell us briefly why you think they deserve to be nominated (the citation part of the nomination form).

• Provide your own contact details.

 

The citation part of the nomination form is broken down into three elements:

1. An overview of why you are nominating this team (maximum of 200 words).

2. An explanation of how they have demonstrated the criteria for this award category (maximum of 200 words).

3. Examples of the results they have achieved as supporting evidence (maximum of 200 words).

 

Please note

A nomination using essentially the same narrative or evidence should not be entered in more than one award by a single nominator. A nominee may be entered more than once in one or more categories by different nominators, providing the narrative in the citation does not duplicate, or near word for word resemble, the citations of other nominators.

Hints and tips

Put yourself in the judges’ shoes. They read lots of citations so capture their attention early, be concise and provide context. It may be obvious to you why an achievement is so worthy of recognition, but our judges may not have the same background or experience so please explain the significance.

 

Providing context to the citation (i.e. sphere of work, day to day tasks, key challenges, etc.), and tangible evidence of the outcome or effect that this had on others will strengthen the nomination hugely. Our judges may not be familiar with all parts of the defence enterprise so avoid, or at the very least explain, acronyms.

There is a word limit of 200 words per section. Even if the form allows you to enter more, the citation sent for judging will be shortened if it exceeds this limit, which could mean that it ends mid-sentence.